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20130216
20130224
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
everything that you hear out of washington. today again president obama rang the alarm bells on the four spending cuts that are set to take effect seven days from now. >> i've been very clear that these kinds of arbitrary automatic cuts would have an adverse impact on families, on teachers, on parents who are reliant on head start programs, on our military readiness, on mental health services on medical search. >> you heard a bit of it there, especially from democrats you're hearing we'll have trouble fighting wildfires, airplanes, security lines will be long, all sorts of things. how much of that is true? how much of it is politics? how do we react to that? "outfront," daniel altman, economics professor at nyu, it political columnist for "newsweek" and "the daily beast." you listened to all this talk about all these dire implications, is it real or is it scare tactics? >> some of it is definitely real. if you look at the figures we're looking at maybe 70,000 kids getting kicked out of head start programs. we're looking at a $1.6 billion cut in funding for the national institutes of heal
just ten days away from washington's latest deadline for forced spending cuts, otherwise known by the distinctly unsexy and misused word, sequester. today, president obama said again something must be done. >> so these cuts are not smart. they are not fair. they will hurt our economy. they will add hundreds of thousands of americans to the unemployment rolls. this is not an abstraction. people will lose their jobs. >> so there are two solutions. number one, lawmakers find another way to punt, ie, delay the cuts for another few months or two, actually come up with a major plan to slash the debt. number two is not going to happen. the punt, i kind of like. anyway, that won't happen. number one has a decent chance. number one has failed, too. after all, the feared forced cuts are only 2.5% of projected total federal spending. we have an economics professor at nyu and former director of the congressional budget office. at this point, are the cuts inevitable? why is the president still talking about it? >> well, we're ten days away and it seems like the republicans really don't want
, hurting the poor because washington has no courage. again today, all we heard was blame when it comes to the forced spending cuts to take effect in eight days. president obama made some talk radio appearances. >> whether or not we can move republicans at this point to do the right thing is what we're still trying to gauge. >> now, he's called the cuts severe and brutal. house speaker john boehner, guess what, completely agrees with that. he's called them deep and dangerous, but they're not doing anything about it. here's the thing about the cuts. they're going to hurt some people that nobody wants to hurt. people already in pain, more than 4 million homebound and disabled seniors may have to go without dinner this year because of cuts to meals on wheels programs in the forced cuts. 70,000 children from lower income families will not be able to enroll in preschools and day care centers because of the forced spending cuts. the owners of about 10,000 homes and small businesses destroyed by hurricane sandy won't get the money needed for repair and recovery. now, there are all kinds of thi
not something that is so popular in washington. we're nine days away now from the forced spending cuts that are going to take effect, and while we may be short on time, we are not short on blame. president obama for one was busy today with no less than eight local television interviews. the president, according to the white house, telling his side of the story directly to the american people, blaming republicans in this interview with wcvb boston. >> the way this arose was back in 2011, the republicans were threatening to default on the full faith and credit of the united states. and we had to avoid that. the hope was that they would use this year and a half to come up with a sensible deficit reduction package. now, we've reduced $2.5 trillion on our deficit. we've got about $1.5 trillion more to go. there's a better way to do it than this, but the key is for them to go ahead and put forward the balanced, responsible approach that will avoid these cuts. >> he wants them to put forth the approach. john boehner, meanwhile with, is the them, sort of. he made his case directly to the peopl
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)